Research Articles

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Below is a list of research articles published in peer-reviewed journals by CHKD-affiliated pediatricians, pediatric subspecialists, pediatric nurses, and other clinicians, sometimes in collaboration with resident physicians and researchers affiliated with Eastern Virginia Medical School, CHKD’s academic partner.

Children’s Health System is committed to the highest ethical and legal standards in the practice of medicine and research. To safeguard the objectivity of our research activities, CHS has a conflict of interest policy in accordance with federal guidelines. This policy is in place to ensure that the design, conduct and reporting of research funded under Public Health Service grants, agreements and contracts is free from bias that may result from an investigator’s financial conflict of interest. Read the policy

January 2014

Pediatrics
Epidemiology of Bacteremia in Febrile Infants in the United States
CHKD-affiliated author(s): Dr. Rianna Evans

This was a retrospective, multi-center chart review of positive blood cultures in febrile infants. The review identified 181 positive blood cultures from 6 centers and found the most common pathogen to be E. coli, followed by group B Streptococcus. There were no cases of Listeria monocytogenes detected, prompting discussion regarding the choice of empiric antibiotic therapy in this population.

May 2013

Pediatrics 
Short-term gestation, long-term risk: prematurity and chronic kidney disease
CHKD-affiliated author(s): J. Bryan Carmody

This article reviews the theory, experimental evidence, and epidemiologic data that suggest an increased long-term risk for chronic kidney disease among infants born prematurely, and presents a risk-based screening algorithm for pediatricians following these patients after their discharge from the NICU.

March 2013

The Laryngoscope
Current use of intralesional cidofovir for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis
CHKD-affiliated author(s): Dr. Craig Derkay

This research involving interviews of 82 surgeons who manage 3,043 patients with a disease of the respiratory tract caused by the Human Papilloma Virus recommends an antiviral medication, cidofovir, as an adjunct to surgery in cases that require repeated surgical intervention.

January 2013

Clinical Pediatrics
Screening Children for Autism in an Urban Clinic Using an Electronic M-CHAT
CHKD-affiliated author(s): Dr. John Harrington

This research evaluated the computerized version of the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) that automatically uses the M-CHAT follow-up interview algorithms for positive screens. This computerized version drastically reduces false positive readings versus the paper M-CHAT that often misidentifies children who are not on the autism spectrum. This computerized M-CHAT could help improve autism screening in private practice by eliminating unnecessary referrals.

September 2012

International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, Volume 76, Issue 9
Quality of Internet information in pediatric otolaryngology: A comparison of three most referenced websites
CHKD-affiliated author(s): Dr. Craig Derkay, Dr. Cristina Baldassari

This research involving interviews of 82 surgeons who manage 3,043 patients with a disease of the respiratory tract caused by the Human Papilloma Virus recommends an antiviral medication, cidofovir, as an adjunct to surgery in cases that require repeated surgical intervention.

American Academy of Pediatrics News, Volume 30, Issue 16
Sickle cell trait only one condition that can increase risk of sudden death during exercise
CHKD-affiliated author(s): Dr. Eric Werner

This article reviews the prevalence of athletes with Sickle cell trait who die suddenly during exercise and recommends both increased testing and education on exercise modification during sports practices, especially when it's hot and humid. 

July 2012 

Archives of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery, Volume 138, Issue 7
Analysis of Pediatric Direct Laryngoscopy and Bronchoscopy Operative Flow: Opportunities for Improved Safety Outcomes
CHKD-affiliated author(s): Dr. Craig Derkay

This study examined minor problems that occur during a common examination of the throat called direct laryngoscopy. Although a common pediatric otolaryngology procedure, direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy operative flow is ideal in less than half the cases. Areas for improvement include obtaining intravenous access, reducing operating room personnel turnover, verifying equipment, and educating staff on operating room setup. To our knowledge, this is the first observational quality improvement initiative in otolaryngology to study the operative flow of a specific procedure and provide insight into areas of patient risk and opportunities for improvement in efficiency.

Infant, Child and Adolescent Nutrition, Volume 4, Number 5
Pediatric Obesity and Nutrition Counseling
CHKD-affiliated author(s): Melanie J Wilhelm DNP, CPNP

About one third of children are overweight/obese. This study examined whether these children were more likely to have nutrition counseling documented, and if counseling was impacted by gender or ethnicity.

April 2012

Molecular Immunology
Potent inhibition of the classical pathway of complement by a novel C1q-binding peptide derived from the human astrovirus coat protein
CHKD-affiliated author(s): Dr. Kenji Cunnion, Neel Krishna, PhD

This research reported on the discovery by two CHKD-affiliated researchers of a compound that can stop a deadly immune response that strikes children and adults after they have suffered prolonged periods without oxygen.

Journal of Emergency Management
Evaluation of a Crisis Management Train the Trainer Program for School Personnel
CHKD-affiliated author(s): Korrie Allen, PsyD, Kelli Will, PhD, Dr. Michael Poirier

Molecular Immunology, Volume 50
Complement regulator C4BP binds to Staphylococcus aureus and decreases opsonization
CHKD-affiliated author(s): Dr. Kenji Cunnion

Pediatrics, Volume 129, Issue 5
Effective Analgesia Using Physical Interventions for Infant Immunizations
CHKD-affiliated author(s): Dr. John Harrington

This research showed that a parenting technique designed to calm agitated infants can be used to reducing crying and pain during infant immunization.

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