Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Reading to Kids Helps Their Development

Research shows that reading regularly to young children is central to their overall growth and development. Reading provides time for special attention between parent and child, encourages the child's later reading success, and fosters language and speech development.

The following are tips for reading to your children.

Pick what you both enjoy

Look for books you both love: Ask friends, teachers or librarians; look for award-winning books; check book reviews; or have your children pick out their own books.

Get your child involved

Point out objects in the pictures as you read; look for activity books that let the child participate; have your child help turn the pages.

Follow along

Follow the words with your finger so your child develops a sense that the words go from left to right.

Read slowly

Slowing down the pace will let your child keep up with the ideas presented in the story.

Key elements

Look for repetition or rhymes in the stories.

Reviewed Date: 12-29-2012

Health Tips
Baby’s Emotional, Intellectual Development
Boost Your Teen Daughter’s Body Image
Cool Tools to Keep Your Kids From Smoking
Could Your Child Have a Drug Problem?
Do Parents Influence Their Kids’ Health Behaviors?
For Kids, Games Can Build Strong Minds
Guidelines for Raising Smoke-Free Kids
How to Talk About Drugs With Your Kids
Is It Time for Toilet Training?
Is Your Child Too Sick for Day Care or School?
Keeping Your Cool When Parenting Teens
Letting Kids Grow Up…At Their Own Pace
Making Rules for Children Reinforces Love
Making This School Year Your Child's Best Ever
New Parents...Sore Backs
Parents-to-Be Must Communicate
Paying for Attention: Abuse of Prescription ADHD Drugs Rising on College Campuses
Preparing Your Daughter for Changes
Solving Battles at Mealtime
Sports and Music: Both Good for Kids
Talk With Your Kids About These Issues
Talking Sex with Your Teen
Teens and Talk: What's a Parent to Do?
TV vs. Activity: Key Choice for Kids
We Can Head Off Teen Tragedies
Weight Room No Longer Off-Limits to Kids
When Children Say 'No' to New Foods
When to Call the Doctor for Childhood Illnesses
Your Child's Imaginary Friend…What It Means
Your Child's Social and Emotional Development
Quizzes
Child Development Quiz
Diseases & Conditions
Discipline
Television and Children
The Growing Child: 1 to 3 Months
The Growing Child: 10 to 12 Months
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Growing Child: 4 to 6 Months
The Growing Child: 7 to 9 Months
The Growing Child: Newborn
The Growing Child: Preschool (4 to 5 Years)
The Growing Child: School-Age (6 to 12 Years)
Vision Overview

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.