Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Prescription Drug Take-Back Day Set for Saturday

FRIDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- If old prescription medications are gathering dust in your medicine cabinet, it's time to scoop them up and get rid of them safely.

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has teamed up with local law enforcement agencies to hold the sixth National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day on Saturday. People can turn in their unwanted or expired prescription medications for free, with no questions asked. DEA officials explained that the event is an attempt to prevent the abuse, misuse or accidental ingestion of unused medications.

"Everything we do is geared toward protecting American families and communities," DEA administrator Michele Leonhart said in an agency news release. "We know that young people consider controlled-substance prescription drugs, like Vicodin, to be a safer way to get high, but they couldn't be more wrong. By removing unwanted prescription drugs from their homes, the public helps prevent experimentation, addiction, overdose and even death."

A national poll released earlier this week found that 24 percent of high school students -- more than 5 million teens -- have abused prescription medications.

And the number of Americans abusing prescription drugs is greater than the total number of Americans using cocaine, hallucinogens and heroin, according to the most recent National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

Research has also shown that most abuse or misuse of prescription medications happens with drugs that are kept in medicine cabinets or received from friends or relatives.

On Saturday, the prescription medication collection sites will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. local time, according to the DEA. Collection sites can be located by going to the DEA website.

Only solid medicines will be collected; liquids, injectables or needles can't be turned in at the collection sites, officials said.

The agency added that it has collected more than 1,000 tons of expired or unwanted prescription medications over the past three years.

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more about how to dispose of unused medications.

SOURCE: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, news release, April 25, 2013

Reviewed Date: --

Find a pediatrician
Health Tips
Cough Medicine Abuse by Teens
Could Your Child Have a Drug Problem?
Growing Up Short or Heavy Can Be Difficult
Helping a Friend With an Addiction
Helping Children Conquer Fear
How Old Is 'Old Enough' for Contacts?
How to Help Teenagers With Addicted Parents
How to Prevent Childhood Obesity
How to Spot Drug Use in Kids
How to Talk About Drugs With Your Kids
Is Your Teen Abusing Drugs or Alcohol?
Kids' Health Concerns Ease with Age
Primer: A Parent's Guide to Inhalant Abuse
Primer: GHB, the Club Drug
Primer: What You Need to Know About Ecstasy
Stages of Substance Abuse
Talk With Your Kids About These Issues
Teens and Prescription Drugs
Understanding Prescription Drug Abuse
What Kids Drink Is Important, Too
When Your Child Says, 'I'm Sick'
Quizzes
Addiction Quiz
Drug Abuse Quiz
Inhalant Abuse Quiz
Diseases & Conditions
Adolescent (13 to 18 Years)
AIDS/HIV in Children
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma and Children
Asthma in Children Index
Bicycle, In-Line Skating, Skateboarding Safety--Injury Statistics and Incidence Rates
Bipolar Disorder in Children
Bone Marrow Transplantation in Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Diphtheria in Children
During an Asthma Attack
Ewing Sarcoma
Firearms
Hepatitis B (HBV) in Children
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Meningitis in Children
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Muscular Dystrophy
Myasthenia Gravis in Children
Osteosarcoma in Children
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Poliomyelitis (Polio) in Children
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Children
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Schizophrenia in Children
School-Aged Child Nutrition
Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis
Sports Safety for Children
Substance Abuse/Chemical Dependence in Adolescents
Substance Exposure
Superficial Injuries Overview
Television and Children
Thalassemia
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Heart
The Kidneys
Vision Overview
Whooping Cough (Pertussis)

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.