Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Outdoor Recess May Help Protect Kids From Nearsightedness

FRIDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Being outdoors at recess and increased exposure to sunlight both reduce children's risk of nearsightedness (myopia), two new studies suggest.

The first study, published in the May issue of the journal Ophthalmology, included nearly 350 students at two elementary schools in Taiwan. Students at one school had to spend recess outdoors for the 2009-2010 school year while students at the other school did not have to go outside for recess.

Eye exams were given to students at both schools at the start and end of the school year. Compared to those at the control school, students at the school that required outdoor recess were far less likely to become nearsighted or to shift toward nearsightedness.

The children at the school with mandatory outdoor recess spent a total of 80 minutes a day outdoors. Previously, many of them had spent recess indoors.

Elementary schools should include frequent recess breaks and other outdoor activities in their daily schedules to help protect children's eye development and vision, the researchers said.

"Because children spend a lot of time in school, a school-based intervention is a direct and practical way to tackle the increasing prevalence of myopia," study leader Dr. Pei-Chang Wu, of Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, in Taiwan, said in a journal news release.

In another study published in the same issue of the journal, researchers concluded that increased exposure to sunlight slows the progression of nearsightedness in youngsters. It included nearly 250 Danish school children with myopia. The greater the children's amount of sunlight exposure, the slower the progression of their nearsightedness.

"Our results indicate that exposure to daylight helps protect children from myopia," study leader Dr. Dongmei Cui, of Sun Yat-sen University in China, said in the news release. "This means that parents and others who manage children's time should encourage them to spend time outdoors daily. When that's impractical due to weather or other factors, use of daylight-spectrum indoor lights should be considered as a way to minimize myopia."

More information

The U.S. National Eye Institute has more about nearsightedness.

SOURCE: Ophthalmology, news release, May 1, 2013

Reviewed Date: --

Find a pediatrician
Health Tips
A Parent’s Guide to Choosing Child Care
Baby’s Emotional, Intellectual Development
For Kids, Games Can Build Strong Minds
Glasses Can Help Even Young Children
Growing Up Short or Heavy Can Be Difficult
Help Your Babysitter Prepare for Anything
Helping Children Conquer Fear
How Old Is 'Old Enough' for Contacts?
How to Prevent Childhood Obesity
Is It Time for Toilet Training?
Is Your Child Too Sick for Day Care or School?
Keep an Eye on Your Child's Vision
Kids' Health Concerns Ease with Age
Letting Kids Grow Up…At Their Own Pace
Reading to Kids Helps Their Development
Sports and Music: Both Good for Kids
TV vs. Activity: Key Choice for Kids
Weight Room No Longer Off-Limits to Kids
What Kids Drink Is Important, Too
When Your Child Says, 'I'm Sick'
Your Child's Imaginary Friend…What It Means
Your Child's Social and Emotional Development
Quizzes
Child Development Quiz
Diseases & Conditions
AIDS/HIV in Children
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma and Children
Asthma in Children Index
Bicycle, In-Line Skating, Skateboarding Safety--Injury Statistics and Incidence Rates
Bipolar Disorder in Children
Bone Marrow Transplantation in Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Child Care
Childhood Vision Problems
Diphtheria in Children
Discipline
During an Asthma Attack
Ewing Sarcoma
Eye Disorders in Children
Firearms
Hepatitis B (HBV) in Children
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Meningitis in Children
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Muscular Dystrophy
Myasthenia Gravis in Children
Osteosarcoma in Children
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Poliomyelitis (Polio) in Children
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Children
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Problems with Vision
Schizophrenia in Children
School-Aged Child Nutrition
Signs and Symptoms of Potential Eye Problems
Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis
Sports Safety for Children
Superficial Injuries Overview
Television and Children
Thalassemia
The Growing Child: 1 to 3 Months
The Growing Child: 10 to 12 Months
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Growing Child: 4 to 6 Months
The Growing Child: 7 to 9 Months
The Growing Child: Newborn
The Growing Child: Preschool (4 to 5 Years)
The Growing Child: School-Age (6 to 12 Years)
The Heart
The Kidneys
Vision Overview
Whooping Cough (Pertussis)

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.