Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Black Kids With Diabetes Less Likely to Get Eye Exams

WEDNESDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Black American children with the greatest risk for an eye disease caused by type 1 diabetes are the least likely to have received an eye exam, a new study finds.

Retinopathy is an inflammation of the retina that can lead to blindness. Researchers found that only 64 percent of eligible children were screened for the condition in the two-year study period. This, they said, was despite recommendations for yearly exams to all families.

"Children who were not screened were significantly more likely to be black or have poorer diabetes control," the authors wrote.

Sixty-six percent of white children were screened, compared with 54 percent of black children, according to the study, which was published in the July issue of the journal Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice.

The likelihood of having a screening was not related to whether children had private or public health insurance.

"This study shows that our children who are at highest risk are not receiving the help they need," study senior author Terri Lipman, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, said in a school news release. "We need to ensure that all children have access to adequate healthcare."

Type 1 diabetes, the less common type, always requires treatment with injected insulin or insulin given through a pump. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, is associated with lifestyle choices -- such as diet and physical activity -- and being overweight is a significant risk factor.

Lipman was co-author of another study that found that children with type 2 diabetes also were at risk for retinopathy. Of more than 500 children who had type 2 diabetes for about five years, nearly 14 percent showed early signs of retinopathy.

All the children in the study were overweight or obese. There were no racial differences in terms of the risk of retinopathy. That study appeared in the June issue of the journal Diabetes Care.

"These studies bring to light the importance of screening for eye disease in all children with diabetes," Lipman said.

More information

The U.S. National Eye Institute has more about diabetic retinopathy.

SOURCE: University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, news release, July 2013

Reviewed Date: --

Find a pediatrician
Endocrinology/Diabetology
Eric Gyuricsko, MD
Kent Reifschneider, MD
Reuben Rohn, MD
Melissa Russell, MD
Marta Satin-Smith, MD
Health Tips
Caring for a Child With Type 1 Diabetes
Diabetes Tops Child Obesity's Health Risks
Glasses Can Help Even Young Children
Growing Up Short or Heavy Can Be Difficult
Helping Children Conquer Fear
How Old Is 'Old Enough' for Contacts?
How to Help Your Kids Avoid Type 2 Diabetes
How to Prevent Childhood Obesity
Keep an Eye on Your Child's Vision
Kids' Health Concerns Ease with Age
What Kids Drink Is Important, Too
When Your Child Has Type 1 Diabetes
When Your Child Says, 'I'm Sick'
Your Child's Diabetes Care Team
Quizzes
Diabetes: Test Your Knowledge
NewsLetters
Good Blood Sugar Control Vital for Wound Healing
People with Diabetes Often Have Arthritis, Too
Diseases & Conditions
Adolescents and Diabetes Mellitus
AIDS/HIV in Children
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma and Children
Asthma in Children Index
Bicycle, In-Line Skating, Skateboarding Safety--Injury Statistics and Incidence Rates
Bipolar Disorder in Children
Bone Marrow Transplantation in Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Childhood Vision Problems
Diabetes and Pregnancy
Diet and Diabetes
Diphtheria in Children
During an Asthma Attack
Ewing Sarcoma
Eye Disorders in Children
Firearms
Glossary - Diabetes and Other Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders
Hepatitis B (HBV) in Children
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Meningitis in Children
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Muscular Dystrophy
Myasthenia Gravis in Children
Online Resources - Diabetes and Other Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders
Osteosarcoma in Children
Overview of Diabetes Mellitus
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Poliomyelitis (Polio) in Children
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Children
Pregnancy and Medical Conditions
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Problems with Vision
Schizophrenia in Children
School-Aged Child Nutrition
Signs and Symptoms of Potential Eye Problems
Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis
Sports Safety for Children
Superficial Injuries Overview
Teens and Diabetes
Television and Children
Thalassemia
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Heart
The Kidneys
Type 1 Diabetes in Children
Type 2 Diabetes in Children
Vision Overview
Whooping Cough (Pertussis)
Animations
Diabetes Detective: Examining the Evidence Animation
Diabetes Detective: Uncovering the Complications Animation

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.