James Paulson, PhD

"I am enthusiastic about CHKD's growing focus on behavioral health. CHKD is in a unique and important position to be a leader in helping to improve the lives of children and families living with health issues that are intertwined with difficulties in feeling, thinking, and acting."

James Paulson, PhD

(757) 668-8866
Practice
Education
Doctorate: University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Bio

Paulson is a licensed clinical psychologist and an associate professor of pediatrics at Eastern Virginia Medical School. He has been a practicing psychologist, working with children, adolescents, and their families, since 1998.

He is also an associate professor of psychology at Old Dominion University, where he teaches and conducts research focusing on the transition to parenthood and how early family factors impact child development.

Paulson completed his fellowship at Eastern Virginia Medical School's Center for Pediatric Research and has been a member of the CHKD community for some time.

Clinical Interests
  • Anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorders
  • Eating and feeding disorders
  • Problems with elimination or toilet training
  • Disruptive behavior problems
  • Family-based interventions
Research Areas
  • Parenting
  • Family transitions, especially pregnancy and childbirth
  • Family dynamics and early child development
Community Involvement
  • Associate editor, Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings
  • Referee and content expert, Cochrane International Pregnancy and Childbirth Group
  • Expert panel member, International Zero to Three Initiative 
Publications
  • Paulson JF, Goodman, J, Bazemore, SD, Leiferman JA (2016). Course of maternal and paternal perinatal depression. Archives of Women’s Mental Health. 19(4), 655-663.
  • Paulson, JF, Mehta, SH, Sokol, RK, & Chauhan, SP. (2014). Large for gestational age and long-term cognitive function. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 210(4), 1-4.
  • Maduro, RS, Roberts, LB, Sheehan, BE, & Paulson, JF (in press). Predicting harsh parental decisions: A Prospective validation study. New School Psychology Bulletin.
  • Leazer R, Erickson N, Paulson JF, Zipkin R, Stemmle M, Schroeder A, Bendel-Stenzel M, & Fine B. (in press). Time to detection and epidemiology of positive cerebrospinal fluid cultures in term infants. Pediatrics.
  • Obermeyer, RJ, Godbout, E, Goretsky, MJ, Paulson, JF, Frantz, FW, Kuhn, MA, Lombardo, ML, Buescher, ES, Deyerle, A, & Kelly, RE (2016). Risk factors and management of Nuss bar infections. Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 51, 154-158.
  • Paulson, JF, Chauhan, SP, Hill, JB, Abuhamad, AZ (2012). Severe small-for-gestational-age and cognitive function: A Catch-Up Phenomenon Possible. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 207 (2). 1-5.
  • Paulson, JF, Dauber, SE, & Leiferman, JA. (2011). Parental Depression, Relationship Quality, and Nonresident Father Involvement with their Infants. Journal of Family Issues, 32(4) 528-549.
  • Paulson, JF & Bazemore, SD (2010). Capturing cases of depression outside the clinic: What is the lesser evil? JAMA, 304(9), 961.
  • Paulson, JF & Bazemore, SD. (2010) Prenatal and postpartum depression in fathers and its association with maternal depression: A Meta-analysis. JAMA, 303 (19), 1961-1969.
(757) 668-8866

More Than A Hospital