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Health Library A to Z

W

  • Home Wound Care
  • Your child may come home with unhealed areas that still require dressing changes. You will be instructed on how to change dressings before you leave the hospital.

  • Transient Tachypnea of the Newborn
  • Transient tachypnea of the newborn is a term for a mild respiratory problem of babies that begins after birth and lasts about three days.

  • Warmth and Temperature Regulation
  • Premature and low birthweight babies may be too immature to regulate their own temperature, even in a warm environment. Even full-term and healthy newborns may not be able to maintain their body temperature if the environment is too cold.

  • Warts in Children
  • Detailed information on the most common types of warts, including foot warts, flat warts, genital warts, and filiform warts

  • Watch that Backpack Load
  • When your child acts as if she’s carrying the weight of the world on her shoulders, maybe you should check her backpack.

  • Water Safety and Teens
  • Encourage your adolescent to take swimming, diving, and water safety or rescue classes to give him/her the skills needed to swim and dive safely.

  • Water Safety--Prevention
  • If your children are around bodies of water on a regular basis, learn CPR. CPR can save lives, reduce the severity of injury, and improve the chance of survival.

  • We Can Head Off Teen Tragedies
  • Preventing teen turmoil starts at birth. Parents set examples in the way they interact, express anger, and treat substance abuse.

  • Weight Room No Longer Off-Limits to Kids
  • The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Sports Medicine now say that strength training is fine for kids, as long as they are supervised and don't try to lift too much weight.

  • What Kids Drink Is Important
  • The best beverages for your child are milk and water. Soft drinks add a lot of sugar and calories to a child’s diet.

  • What Tests Does Your Newborn Baby Need?
  • You may think your child's first test will come in school, but it will actually happen before leaving the hospital's newborn unit. Early screening tests for babies can find problems before symptoms arise, prompting early treatment.

  • What to Do if Your Child Needs Surgery
  • If having surgery makes you nervous, imagine how it can seem for a child. By helping the youngster anticipate and face those fears, you can ease the trauma and smooth the way for a quicker, easier recovery.

  • What You Can Do to Prevent Child Abuse
  • Child abuse can happen in any family and in any neighborhood. Studies have shown that child abuse crosses all boundaries of income, race, ethnic heritage and religious faith.

  • What You Need to Know About Heroin
  • Until recently, heroin was not considered a problem among children of middle-class parents. But lately, it has been showing up in new places.

  • When Children Say 'No' to New Foods
  • When it comes time to eat vegetables, do your children do the Brussels-sprout pout? Well, don't give up. It can take eight to 10 tries before children accept a new food, experts say.

  • When to Call Your Child's Doctor
  • These are reasons to call your child's doctor: signs of infection, uncontrollable itching, a scar that cracks open or splits.

  • When to Keep Your Child Home From School
  • Here are some tips for deciding what to do when a child awakens with a health complaint and you must determine whether the complaint is serious enough to warrant a sick day.

  • When Your Child Refuses to Go to School
  • School avoidance syndrome, as described by doctors, is the most common cause of vague, unverifiable symptoms in school-age children and is triggered by stress, says a clinical professor of pediatrics.

  • Whooping Cough (Pertussis)
  • Whooping cough, or pertussis, mainly affects infants and young children. It is characterized by intense coughing spells that end with a characteristic whoop as air is inhaled.

  • Why Childhood Immunizations Are Important
  • Vaccinations not only protect your child from deadly diseases such as polio, tetanus, and diphtheria, but they also keep other children safe by eliminating or greatly decreasing dangerous diseases that used to spread from child to child.

  • Wilms Tumor
  • Detailed information on Wilms tumor, including causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment