Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Childhood Abuse May Lead to Health Ills in Adulthood

Childhood Abuse May Lead to Health Ills in Adulthood

THURSDAY, March 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood abuse or neglect could take a lasting toll on physical health, a new study suggests.

It found that child maltreatment may trigger long-term hormone problems that increase the risk of obesity, diabetes and other health problems in adulthood.

Researchers examined levels of weight-regulating hormones in 95 adults, aged 35 to 65, who suffered physical, emotional or sexual abuse or neglect as children. They were grouped according to the severity of abuse and neglect.

Three hormones were examined in the study. Leptin is involved in appetite regulation and is linked to fat levels. Irisin is involved in energy metabolism. Adiponectin reduces inflammation in the body.

The adults who suffered the most severe abuse and neglect during childhood tended to have higher levels of leptin and irisin and lower levels of adiponectin. The irregularities in the levels of these hormones are all risk factors for obesity.

Even after the researchers accounted for differences in diet, exercise and other lifestyle factors, the found that high levels of leptin and irisin were still associated with childhood abuse and neglect.

The findings are to be published in the June issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

"This study helps illuminate why people who have dealt with childhood adversity face a higher risk of developing excess belly fat and related health conditions," study author Dr. Christos Mantzoros, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and the VA Boston Healthcare System, said in a journal news release.

"The data suggest that childhood adversity places stress on the endocrine system, leading to impairment of important hormones that can contribute to abdominal obesity well into adulthood," he added.

"Understanding these mechanisms could help health care providers develop new and better interventions to address this population's elevated risk of abdominal obesity and cardio-metabolic risk later in life," Mantzoros concluded.

The study found an association between child abuse or neglect and variations in hormone levels linked to obesity. It didn't prove cause-and-effect.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases outlines the health risks of being overweight.

SOURCE: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, news release, March 20, 2014

Reviewed Date: --

This content was reviewed by Mid-Atlantic Womens Care, PLC. Please visit their site to find an Mid-Atlantic Womens Care obstetrician.

Find a pediatrician
Helpful Information
Mid-Atlantic Womens's Care
Endocrinology/Diabetology
Dr. Ayanna Butler-Cephas
Dr. Eric Gyuricsko
Dr. Kent Reifschneider
Dr. Reuben Rohn
Dr. Melissa Russell
Dr. Marta Satin-Smith
Health Tips
Abuse of Prescription ADHD Drugs Rising on College Campuses
Cool Tools to Keep Your Kids From Smoking
Do Parents Influence Their Kids’ Health Behaviors?
For Kids, Games Can Build Strong Minds
Guidelines for Raising Smoke-Free Kids
Helping Children Conquer Fear
How Old Is 'Old Enough' for Contacts?
Is It Time for Toilet Training?
Parents-to-Be Must Communicate
Preparing Your Daughter for Changes
Reading to Kids Helps Their Development
Recognizing Domestic Violence
Someone's in the Kitchen with Grandma
Sports and Music: Both Good for Kids
Talk With Your Kids About These Issues
Talking Sex with Your Teen
Teens and Talk: What's a Parent to Do?
We Can Head Off Teen Tragedies
Weight Room No Longer Off-Limits to Kids
When to Call the Doctor for Childhood Illnesses
Quizzes
Child Development Quiz
Diabetes: Test Your Knowledge
NewsLetters
Diabetes Rates Have Nearly Doubled
Good Blood Sugar Control Vital for Wound Healing
People with Diabetes Often Have Arthritis, Too
Diseases & Conditions
Adolescents and Diabetes Mellitus
AIDS/HIV in Children
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma in Children Index
Bone Marrow Transplantation in Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Diphtheria in Children
Discipline
Ewing Sarcoma
Firearms
Hepatitis B (HBV) in Children
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Meningitis in Children
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Muscular Dystrophy
Myasthenia Gravis in Children
Osteosarcoma in Children
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Poliomyelitis (Polio) in Children
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Children
Pregnancy and Medical Conditions
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Schizophrenia in Children
School-Aged Child Nutrition
Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis
Sports Safety for Children
Superficial Injuries Overview
Television and Children
Thalassemia
The Growing Child: 1 to 3 Months
The Growing Child: 10 to 12 Months
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Growing Child: 4 to 6 Months
The Growing Child: 7 to 9 Months
The Growing Child: Newborn
The Growing Child: Preschool (4 to 5 Years)
The Growing Child: School-Age (6 to 12 Years)
The Heart
The Kidneys
Vision Overview
Whooping Cough (Pertussis)
Your Child's Asthma
Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.