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Health Tip: Check Your Child's Playground

Health Tip: Check Your Child's Playground

(HealthDay News) -- Inspecting a playground before your children start swinging and sliding can help you identify potential dangers.

The National Safety Council offers these tips for parents:

  • Make sure playground equipment is surrounded by at least 12 inches of fill, such as sand, mulch or wood chips. Allow a 6-foot area of fill around a play set on all sides.

  • Check that any openings are less than 3.5 inches or more than 9 inches square to avoid trapping children.

  • Any raised platform should be surrounded by a guardrail at least 29 inches high for preschoolers, and at least 38 inches high for school-age children.

  • Inspect the playground for any raised areas that could trip children, such as tree roots, rocks or concrete footings.

  • Look for any sharp or hazardous objects, such as "S" hooks or bolts that stick out.

  • Only allow your child to play on age-appropriate equipment.

  • Carefully supervise your child at the playground.

  • Do not let your child wear clothing with hoods or drawstrings, which could get caught in playground equipment.

Reviewed Date: --

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Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.