Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Kids' Sun Safety Means 'Slip, Slap, Slop'

Kids' Sun Safety Means 'Slip, Slap, Slop'

FRIDAY, April 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children spend a lot of time outside in the summer, so parents need to stay on top of their sun protection, a skin cancer expert advises.

Much of a person's risk for melanoma -- the deadliest form of skin cancer -- comes from their sun exposure as a child.

"Healthy sun-protection habits come in three forms -- sometimes referred to as slip, slap, slop," said Dr. Vernon Sondak. He is head of the skin cancer department at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla.

"Slip on protective clothing, like long-sleeve shirts and long pants with an adequate UV (ultraviolet radiation) protection factor," Sondak said in a center news release. UV protection factor (UPF) is the clothing equivalent of sun protection factor (SPF) for sunscreen.

Next, slap on a hat -- not just a baseball cap -- to protect your face, head, ears and neck. And don't forget to protect your eyes with sunglasses, he added.

Last, but not least, slop on sunscreen -- and use plenty of it to cover all your exposed skin. "Then reapply it every few hours and after swimming," Sondak advised.

Sunscreen comes third on this list for a reason, he said. The best protection is staying out of the sun during peak UV hours (10 a.m. to 3 p.m.) and protecting skin with a big hat, sunglasses and protective clothing when you are outside.

"Sunscreen should be your third line of defense, not your first," Sondak stressed.

Schools should ensure that children are adequately protected from the sun during recess, gym classes and other outdoor activities, the skin-cancer specialist added.

Noting that some schools require a doctor's prescription or a parent's note before a child can use sunscreen or wear a hat at school, Sondak said some of these rules may go too far.

"We recognize that there are legitimate concerns that do sometimes arise when schools allow students to bring sunscreens and hats to school, but these are clearly addressable," he said.

"A parent's note might be a reasonable request, but a doctor's prescription is neither necessary nor appropriate for such a fundamentally important protection," Sondak said.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more on sun safety.

SOURCE: Moffitt Cancer Center, news release

Reviewed Date: --

Find a pediatrician
Dermatology
Dr. Julia Burden
Dr. Laura Gifford
Dr. Judith Williams
Hematology and Oncology
Dr. Wilson File
Dr. Eric Lowe
Dr. William Owen
Dr. Linda Pegram
Dr. Katherine Watson
Dr. Eric Werner
Dr. Gary Woods
Childrens Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Dr. J. Marc Cardelia
Dr. Allison Crepeau
Dr. Cara Novick
Dr. Jeremy Saller
Dr. H. Sheldon St. Clair
Dr. Carl St. Remy
Dr. Allison Tenfelde
Sports Medicine
Dr. Joel Brenner
Dr. Aisha Joyce
Dr. David Smith
Health Tips
Abuse of Prescription ADHD Medicines Rising on College Campuses
Guidelines for Raising Smoke-Free Kids
Helping Kids Get Over their Fears
How Old Is "Old Enough" for Contacts?
Parenting Déjà vu: Raising Your Grandchildren
Parents-to-Be Must Communicate
Reading to Kids Helps Their Development
Talk With Your Kids About These Issues
Talking About Sex with Your Teen
Diseases & Conditions
About Cancer
Alternative Therapy for Cancer
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma in Children Index
Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) in Children
Bone Marrow Transplant for Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Causes of Cancer
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Coping with a Diagnosis of Cancer in Children
Diagnosing Cancer
Discipline
Ewing Sarcoma in Children
Fire Safety and Burns Overview
Firearms
Hepatitis B (HBV) in Children
Home Page - Burns
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Meningitis in Children
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Myasthenia Gravis (MG) in Children
Nutritional Requirements for a Child With Cancer
Osteosarcoma (Osteogenic Sarcoma) in Children
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Children
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Schizophrenia in Children
School-Aged Child Nutrition
Skin Cancer in Children
Sports Safety for Children
Sunburn and Children
Superficial Injuries Overview
Television and Children
Thalassemia
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Heart
The Kidneys
Topic Index - Burns
Treatment for Cancer
Treatment for Skin Cancer in Children
Your Child's Asthma
Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.