Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Hospital 'Baby Boxes' May Help Prevent SIDS in Newborns

Hospital 'Baby Boxes' May Help Prevent SIDS in Newborns

FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Child care experts say it's dangerous for infants to sleep in the same bed with their parents. Now, researchers report that "baby boxes" and parent education can help reduce the unsafe practice.

Bed-sharing is linked with sleep-related deaths in babies, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and accidental suffocation and strangulation, according to background information with this study.

For the study, researchers at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia recruited more than 2,700 new mothers. Half were instructed face-to-face about safe infant sleep and given a baby box (a cardboard bassinet) with a firm mattress. The other half received only standard nursing discharge instructions with information about safe infant sleep.

The combination of baby box and face-to-face instructions reduced the rate of bed-sharing by 25 percent during infants' first eight days of life, the study found.

For exclusively breast-fed infants -- who are at increased risk of bed-sharing -- there was a 50 percent reduction in bed-sharing, the researchers said.

"Future studies are needed to determine if the effect of this intervention is sustainable through the first 6 to 12 months of life," said lead investigator Dr. Megan Heere, an assistant professor of pediatrics.

Whether this approach can significantly reduce sleep-related deaths in large populations over time also needs to be evaluated, she said in a Temple news release.

Most mothers who received a baby box said they used the box as a sleeping place for their infants, and 12 percent said the box was the usual sleeping space for their infants.

Among mothers who exclusively breast-fed and also used the box as a sleeping space, 59 percent said the box made breast-feeding easier, according to the study.

The results were presented at the recent Pediatric Academic Societies meeting, in San Francisco. Findings presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development has more on safe sleep for infants.

SOURCE: Temple University, news release, May 22, 2017

Reviewed Date: --

Find a pediatrician
Health Tips
Abuse of Prescription ADHD Medicines Rising on College Campuses
Guidelines for Raising Smoke-Free Kids
Help Your Babysitter Prepare for Anything
Helping Kids Get Over their Fears
How Old Is "Old Enough" for Contacts?
Parenting Déjà vu: Raising Your Grandchildren
Parents-to-Be Must Communicate
Reading to Kids Helps Their Development
Talk With Your Kids About These Issues
Talking About Sex with Your Teen
Diseases & Conditions
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma in Children Index
Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) in Children
Bone Marrow Transplant for Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Breast Milk Collection and Storage
Breast Milk Expression
Breastfeeding Difficulties - Mother
Breastfeeding Your Baby
Breastfeeding Your Premature Baby
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Child Care
Discipline
Ewing Sarcoma in Children
Firearms
Hepatitis B (HBV) in Children
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Meningitis in Children
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Myasthenia Gravis (MG) in Children
Osteosarcoma (Osteogenic Sarcoma) in Children
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Children
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Schizophrenia in Children
School-Aged Child Nutrition
Sports Safety for Children
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)
Superficial Injuries Overview
Television and Children
Thalassemia
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Heart
The Kidneys
Your Child's Asthma
Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.