Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Community Intervention May Aid Fight Against Childhood Obesity

Community Intervention May Aid Fight Against Childhood Obesity

WEDNESDAY, June 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- It has been said it takes a village to raise a child. Now, a new study suggests that it might take a community to achieve modest reductions in obesity rates among U.S. children.

The study authors tested a new program in two low-income Massachusetts communities. The goal was to get elementary and middle school students to eat more fruits and vegetables, drink less sugar-sweetened beverages, get more physical activity and sleep, and reduce screen time.

Interventions ranged from individual and family counseling, to providing physical activity equipment to schools, the researchers explained.

Children in the two test communities were compared with a "control group" of children in nine similar communities without the program. Obesity rates were assessed among 1st, 4th and 7th graders, starting from four years before the program began and at several points during its progression.

The obesity rate among 7th graders in one of the test communities was 2 percent to 3 percent lower than among children in the control group, the findings showed.

In both test communities, kids in grades 4 and 7 drank less sugar-sweetened beverages and more water, according to the report. In addition, students in one of the test communities spent less time in front of TV and computer screens than those in the control group.

"While our results were modest, they were achieved over a relatively short period of time, which is important given the substantial challenges of implementing a large-scale community initiative to address obesity," study lead author Rebecca Franckle, a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said in a school news release.

The study is scheduled for publication in the July issue of the journal Obesity.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on preventing childhood obesity.

SOURCE: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, news release, June 27, 2017

Reviewed Date: --

Find a pediatrician
Health Tips
A Chubby Baby Is Not a Sign of Future Obesity
Helping Kids Get Over their Fears
How Old Is "Old Enough" for Contacts?
Is It Time for Toilet Training?
Making Family Fitness Fun
Reading to Kids Helps Their Development
Sports and Music: Both Good for Kids
Weight Room No Longer Off-Limits to Kids
Quizzes
Child Development Quiz
Food Quiz
Food Safety Quiz
Swimming Quiz
Prevention
Prevention Guidelines for Men 18 to 39
Prevention Guidelines for Women 18 to 39
Prevention Guidelines for Women 40-49
Prevention Guidelines for Women 50-64
Prevention Guidelines for Women 65+
Prevention Guidelines, Ages 2 to 18
NewsLetters
Screenings May Help Trim Childhood Obesity
Diseases & Conditions
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma in Children Index
Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) in Children
Bone Marrow Transplant for Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Discipline
Ewing Sarcoma in Children
Exercise and Adolescents
Exercise and Children
Firearms
Hepatitis B (HBV) in Children
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Meningitis in Children
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Myasthenia Gravis (MG) in Children
Normal Newborn Behaviors and Activities
Obesity in Teens
Osteosarcoma (Osteogenic Sarcoma) in Children
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Children
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Schizophrenia in Children
School-Aged Child Nutrition
Sports Safety for Children
Superficial Injuries Overview
Television and Children
Thalassemia
The Growing Child: 1 to 3 Months
The Growing Child: 10 to 12 Months
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Growing Child: 4 to 6 Months
The Growing Child: 7 to 9 Months
The Growing Child: Newborn
The Growing Child: Preschool (4 to 5 Years)
The Growing Child: School-Age (6 to 12 Years)
The Heart
The Kidneys
Your Child's Asthma
Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.