Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Do Moms Who Smoke in Pregnancy Raise Their Odds for a Troubled Teen?

Do Moms Who Smoke in Pregnancy Raise Their Odds for a Troubled Teen?

TUESDAY, July 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Expectant mothers have been warned for years to avoid cigarettes. Now researchers report another reason to follow that advice: Teens and young adults whose mothers smoked during pregnancy may be more likely to break the law and be antisocial.

The study included thousands of people in New England who were followed from birth into their 30s.

The research wasn't designed to prove cause-and-effect. However, kids of women who smoked an extra pack of cigarettes a day had a 30 percent increased risk of three or more symptoms of conduct disorder as a teen, and a more than threefold increased risk of three or more symptoms of antisocial personality disorder as a young adult, the investigators found.

These children also had a more than double increased risk of having a record of non-violent offenses as a teen and of committing a violent offense as a young adult, the findings showed.

The link between smoking during pregnancy and antisocial behavior in offspring was independent of other factors often seen among women who smoke during pregnancy, such as a history of mental illness, a low level of schooling and low income.

The study was published online July 10 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

"Maternal smoking in pregnancy is potentially modifiable, and remains prevalent among particular subgroups of women, including teenage mothers and mothers with less than a high school education," noted researcher Angela Paradis. She is from the department of epidemiology at Brown University's School of Public Health, in Providence.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more on antisocial personality disorder.

SOURCE: Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, news release, July 10, 2017

Reviewed Date: --

This content was reviewed by Mid-Atlantic Womens Care, PLC. Please visit their site to find an Mid-Atlantic Womens Care obstetrician.

Find a pediatrician
Helpful Information
Mid-Atlantic Womens's Care
Childrens Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Dr. J. Marc Cardelia
Dr. Allison Crepeau
Dr. Cara Novick
Dr. Jeremy Saller
Dr. H. Sheldon St. Clair
Dr. Carl St. Remy
Dr. Allison Tenfelde
Sports Medicine
Dr. Joel Brenner
Dr. Aisha Joyce
Dr. David Smith
Pulmonology
Dr. Frank Chocano
Dr. Cynthia Epstein
Dr. Lori Vanscoy
Health Tips
Guidelines for Raising Smoke-Free Kids
How to Quit Smoking, Again
Is It Time for Toilet Training?
Reading to Kids Helps Their Development
Sports and Music: Both Good for Kids
Talk With Your Kids About These Issues
Vaping and E-Cigarettes
Weight Room No Longer Off-Limits to Kids
Quizzes
Child Development Quiz
Healthy Pregnancy Quiz
Nicotine Quiz
Teen Health Quiz
Diseases & Conditions
Adolescent (13 to 18 Years)
Adolescents and Diabetes Mellitus
Amenorrhea in Teens
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Breast Conditions in Young Women
Digestive and Liver Disorders Overview
Discipline
Ewing Sarcoma in Children
Female Growth and Development
Graves Disease in Pregnancy
Gynecological and Menstrual Conditions
High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents
Home Page - Adolescent Medicine
Lupus and Pregnancy
Major Depression in Teens
Maternal and Fetal Infections Overview
Maternal and Fetal Testing Overview
Medical Genetics: Teratogens
Menstrual Cramps (Dysmenorrhea) in Teens
Menstrual Disorders
Migraine Headaches During Pregnancy
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Neurological Conditions and Pregnancy
Normal Newborn Behaviors and Activities
Oral Health
Osteosarcoma (Osteogenic Sarcoma) in Children
Overview of Adolescent Health Problems
Pap Test for Adolescents
Preconception Care
Pregnancy and Medical Conditions
Risk Factors for Pregnancy
Schizophrenia in Children
Sickle Cell Disease and Pregnancy
Smoking
The Growing Child: 1 to 3 Months
The Growing Child: 10 to 12 Months
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Growing Child: 4 to 6 Months
The Growing Child: 7 to 9 Months
The Growing Child: Adolescent (13 to 18 Years)
The Growing Child: Newborn
The Growing Child: Preschool (4 to 5 Years)
The Growing Child: School-Age (6 to 12 Years)
Thyroid Conditions
Varicella and Pregnancy
Your Child's Asthma

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.