Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Researchers Learn More About Gender's Role in Autism Risk

Researchers Learn More About Gender's Role in Autism Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Having a daughter with autism is linked to an increased risk that younger siblings will also have the disorder, new research suggests.

And that's especially true if the younger siblings are boys, the study authors said.

It had been known that having one child with autism raised the chances of having another child with autism, but the role of gender in that risk was unclear.

Having this information can help doctors and genetic counselors in assisting families who have a child with autism, the researchers said.

"It is important to be able to provide worried parents who have one child with the condition some sense of what they can expect with their next child. That information is critical given how much better we've become at screening for the disease earlier and earlier in life," said study first author Nathan Palmer. He's an instructor in biomedical informatics at Harvard Medical School.

But the researchers emphasized that autism affects only about 1 percent of the general population.

"Even for the group at highest risk -- males with an older female sibling with autism -- the odds are still about five to one that the child will be unaffected," Palmer said in a Harvard news release.

The new study looked at data from more than 1.5 million U.S. families with two children between the ages of 4 and 18. About 2 percent of boys and 0.5 percent of girls had been diagnosed with autism or an autism spectrum disorder.

The study reported that having one child with autism was tied to an increased risk in subsequent children, and that the risk was higher in boys than in girls.

The rate of autism diagnosis was 17 percent among boys with an older sister with autism, 13 percent among boys with an older brother with autism, 8 percent among girls with an older sister with autism, and 4 percent among girls with an older brother with autism, according to the report.

But the study only found an association between older siblings with autism and the potential impact on younger siblings. It did not prove cause and effect.

The study was published online Sept. 25 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

In the United States, an estimated one in 68 school-aged children has an autism spectrum disorder, according to an estimate from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Symptoms include difficulty communicating and interacting with others, and a tendency toward repetitive behaviors and obsessions.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on autism.

SOURCE: Harvard Medical School, news release, Sept. 25, 2017

Reviewed Date: --

This content was reviewed by Mid-Atlantic Womens Care, PLC. Please visit their site to find an Mid-Atlantic Womens Care obstetrician.

Find a pediatrician
Helpful Information
Mid-Atlantic Womens's Care
Health Tips
Abuse of Prescription ADHD Medicines Rising on College Campuses
Guidelines for Raising Smoke-Free Kids
Helping Kids Get Over their Fears
How Old Is "Old Enough" for Contacts?
Is It Time for Toilet Training?
Parenting Déjà vu: Raising Your Grandchildren
Parents-to-Be Must Communicate
Reading to Kids Helps Their Development
Sports and Music: Both Good for Kids
Talk With Your Kids About These Issues
Talking About Sex with Your Teen
Weight Room No Longer Off-Limits to Kids
Quizzes
Autism Quiz
Child Development Quiz
Diseases & Conditions
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma in Children Index
Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children
Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) in Children
Bone Marrow Transplant for Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Cystic Fibrosis Overview
Discipline
Ewing Sarcoma in Children
Firearms
Hepatitis B (HBV) in Children
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Medical Genetics: DNA Studies for Single Gene Defects
Medical Genetics: Types of Genetic Changes
Meningitis in Children
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Myasthenia Gravis (MG) in Children
Osteosarcoma (Osteogenic Sarcoma) in Children
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Children
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Schizophrenia in Children
School-Aged Child Nutrition
Single Gene Defects
Sports Safety for Children
Superficial Injuries Overview
Television and Children
Testing for Birth Defects
Thalassemia
The Growing Child: 1 to 3 Months
The Growing Child: 10 to 12 Months
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Growing Child: 4 to 6 Months
The Growing Child: 7 to 9 Months
The Growing Child: Newborn
The Growing Child: Preschool (4 to 5 Years)
The Growing Child: School-Age (6 to 12 Years)
The Heart
The Kidneys
Your Child's Asthma
Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.