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Health Tip: Encourage Your Child to be Active

Health Tip: Encourage Your Child to be Active

(HealthDay News) -- If children adopt active lifestyles at a young age, they are less likely to become obese as adults, research shows.

One in three children is overweight or obese, the American Academy of Pediatrics says. The group adds that children and teens spend an average of seven hours per day using TVs, computers, phones and other electronic devices for entertainment.

The academy suggests how to encourage your child to become more active:

  • Find an age-appropriate physical activity that your child enjoys.

  • Plan ahead and make time for exercise.

  • Provide your child with all necessary safety equipment.

  • Provide active toys, such as balls and jump ropes.

  • Be a role model and lead an active lifestyle.

  • Play with your child as your child learns a new sport.

  • Limit TV, computer and phone use to no more than two hours daily.

Reviewed Date: --

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Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.