Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Fit Kids Have Healthier Lungs as Adults: Study

Fit Kids Have Healthier Lungs as Adults: Study

THURSDAY, Feb. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Yet another reason to get your child off the couch: Fit children have healthier lungs later, new research suggests.

"This study shows that children who are physically fit go on to have better lung function as young adults," said lead researcher Bob Hancox.

"We think that this could reduce the risk of them developing chronic lung diseases as they get older," said Hancox, a respiratory specialist at the University of Otago, in New Zealand.

Chronic lung conditions, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are a leading cause of ill health around the world, the research team noted.

This study included more than 1,000 participants in New Zealand and more than 1,300 in Denmark. The New Zealanders had their fitness levels and lung function checked at ages 15, 26, 32 and 38. Similar assessments were done in Denmark at ages 9, 15, 21 and 29.

The researchers found that fitter children had better lung function. Also, the more their fitness improved during childhood, the greater their lung capacity in adulthood. The findings were stronger in males than females.

The results were published Feb. 1 in the European Respiratory Journal.

"We don't know why fitness and lung function are linked, but one explanation could be that fitter people have better respiratory muscle strength as well as other muscle strength," Hancox said in a journal news release.

The researchers will continue to assess the participants' fitness and lung function as they age.

"We need to keep studying these people to find out whether the association between fitness and lung function continues into later adulthood. If it does, improving and maintaining fitness could translate into important reductions in chronic lung disease," Hancox said.

Although the study can't establish a direct cause and effect relationship, Hancox believes the findings should motivate parents to get their kids moving.

"Exercise and fitness are good for our bodies, and this appears to be true for our lungs as well as other aspects of health," he concluded.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on children and physical activity.

SOURCE: European Respiratory Journal, news release, Jan. 31, 2018

Reviewed Date: --

Find a pediatrician
Infectious Disease
Dr. Kenji Cunnion
Dr. Randall Fisher
Dr. Laura Sass
Pulmonology
Dr. Frank Chocano
Dr. Cynthia Epstein
Dr. Lori Vanscoy
Health Tips
Abuse of Prescription ADHD Medicines Rising on College Campuses
Guidelines for Raising Smoke-Free Kids
Helping Kids Get Over their Fears
How Old Is "Old Enough" for Contacts?
Making Family Fitness Fun
Parenting Déjà vu: Raising Your Grandchildren
Parents-to-Be Must Communicate
Reading to Kids Helps Their Development
Talk With Your Kids About These Issues
Talking About Sex with Your Teen
Quizzes
COPD Quiz
Swimming Quiz
NewsLetters
4 Things to Do After Your Workout
5 Health Habits That Could Hurt You
Boost Your Home Workout with These 3 Tips
Don’t Resist Resistance Bands
Get Moving—Even While Binge-Watching TV—To Reduce Your Blood Clot Risk
Manage Your High Cholesterol with These Moves
Diseases & Conditions
Acute Respiratory Disorders
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma in Children Index
Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) in Children
Bone Marrow Transplant for Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Chronic Lung Disease in Premature Babies
Discipline
Ewing Sarcoma in Children
Exercise and Adolescents
Exercise and Children
Firearms
Hepatitis B (HBV) in Children
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Meningitis in Children
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Myasthenia Gravis (MG) in Children
Osteosarcoma (Osteogenic Sarcoma) in Children
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Children
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Schizophrenia in Children
School-Aged Child Nutrition
Sports Safety for Children
Superficial Injuries Overview
Television and Children
Thalassemia
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Heart
The Kidneys
Upper Respiratory Disorders
Your Child's Asthma
Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.