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Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups

Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups

What happens during a flare-up?

Children with asthma have severe episodes or flare-ups when the air passages in their lungs become narrower and breathing becomes more difficult. Sensitive airways react to certain things, called triggers. Triggers can cause:

  • The lining of the airways (bronchial tubes) to become more inflamed and swollen

  • Tightening of the muscles that surround the airways

  • Increased mucus production

  • Decreased air movement through the lungs

Normal airway
Normal Airway

Airway with asthma

Airway with asthma flare-up
Flare Up

Your child may have the following symptoms of a flare-up:

  • It may become harder to breathe.

  • Chest tightness.

  • Coughing.

  • Wheezing or whistling when breathing out. He or she may not have wheezing with very severe flare-ups.

  • Symptoms that wake your child or keep them from sleeping.

  • Trouble walking or talking.

Make sure you know what to do if your child's symptoms worsen. If your child does not get treatment immediately during a flare-up, he or she could stop breathing, or even die.

Reviewed Date: 06-30-2014

Durante un Ataque de Asma
Dr. Angela Duff Hogan
Dr. Cynthia Kelly
Dr. Kelly Maples
Dr. Maripaz Morales
Dr. Lauren Smith
Allergy and Asthma Specialists Ltd.
Dr. Craig S. Koenig
Dr. Gary B. Moss
Dr. Gregory G. Pendell
Dr. John R. Sweeney
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Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.