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Heat or Thermal Burns

Heat or Thermal Burns

A heat-induced or thermal burn can occur when the skin comes in contact with any heat source, such as a cooking pan, an iron, a fire, a hot surface or a hot, scalding liquid.

Caring for a heat-induced or thermal burn:

  • Remove the child from the heat source.

  • Cool the affected area with cold water or cold compresses until pain is reduced or alleviated.

  • If a blister has formed, do not break it.

  • Protect the burn with a dry, sterile, gauze bandage or with a clean bed sheet or cloth.

  • If your child's clothing is stuck to the burned area, do not attempt to remove it. Instead, cut around the clothing leaving the burn intact.

  • Do not apply any ointments, oils, or sprays to the burned area unless prescribed by your doctor.

  • If your child has burns on the hand, foot, face, eyes, or groin, or burns that cover a large area, seek medical attention or dial 911 for emergency medical attention.

Reviewed Date: 05-21-2013

Quemaduras por Calor o Térmicas

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.