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Superficial Injuries Overview

Superficial Injuries Overview

In the course of a child's day, minor injuries may occur during play and sports activities. The face and head are especially at risk for cuts, scrapes, and lacerations because:

  • Children have much larger heads in comparison to the rest of their bodies than adults do. This creates a larger "target" when falls occur.

  • Children's center of balance is not completely adjusted yet due to their rapid growth and "bowed" position of the spine.

  • Children's feet are often "toed-in" causing them to trip and fall when walking and running.

  • Children like to move fast and often run rather than walk, even before they are able to run confidently.

  • Children do not think about consequences for their actions and may act impulsively and create unsafe conditions, such as running with a pencil in their mouth or scissors in their hands.

Regardless of how careful you are about superficial injuries to the face and head in your home, or how many precautions you take when your child is outdoors playing, superficial injuries to the face and head do occur.

By remaining calm and knowing some basic first-aid techniques, you can help your child overcome both the fear and the trauma of superficial injuries to the face and head.

Reviewed Date: 04-25-2013

Descripción General de Lesiones Superficiales
Emergency Medicine
Dr. Omar Blanco
Dr. James Burhop
Dr. Joel Clingenpeel
Dr. Justin De Boer
Dr. Margaret Eason
Dr. Noelle Gabriel
Dr. Jennifer Galiotos
Dr. Sandip Godambe
Dr. Shannon Hogan
Dr. Andrea Hornbuckle
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5 Home Safety Threats You Might Overlook
Helping Kids Get Over their Fears
How Old Is "Old Enough" for Contacts?
Keep Kids Safe During Yard Work
Preventing Household Poisonings
Treating Minor Childhood Injuries
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AIDS/HIV in Children
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma in Children Index
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Bone Marrow Transplantation in Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Corneal Abrasions
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Diphtheria in Children
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Home Page - Burns
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Inguinal Hernia in Children
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Insect Stings
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Lacerations With Stitches
Lacerations Without Stitches
Meningitis in Children
Minor Cuts, Scrapes, and Skin Wounds
Minor Injuries Overview
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Muscle and Joint Injuries
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Schizophrenia in Children
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Skin Injury in Children
Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis
Small Cuts and Scrapes
Sports Safety for Children
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The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Heart
The Kidneys
Tick Bite Diseases
Treatment for Human Bites
Vision Overview
Whooping Cough (Pertussis)
Your Child's Asthma
Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.