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Anatomy of a Child's Brain

What is the central nervous system (CNS)?

The central nervous system (CNS) consists of the brain and spinal cord. The brain is an important organ that controls thought, memory, emotion, touch, motor skills, vision, respirations, temperature, hunger, and every process that regulates our body.

Major parts of the brain, child
Click Image to Enlarge

What are the different parts of the brain?

The brain can be divided into the cerebrum, brainstem, and cerebellum:

  • Cerebrum. The cerebrum (supratentorial or front of brain) is composed of the right and left hemispheres. Functions of the cerebrum include: initiation of movement, coordination of movement, temperature, touch, vision, hearing, speech and language, judgment, reasoning, problem solving, emotions, and learning.

  • Brainstem. The brainstem (midline or middle of brain) includes the midbrain, the pons, and the medulla. Functions of this area include: movement of the eyes and mouth, relaying sensory messages (such as, hot, pain, or loud), hunger, respirations, consciousness, cardiac function, body temperature, involuntary muscle movements, sneezing, coughing, vomiting, and swallowing.

  • Cerebellum. The cerebellum (infratentorial or back of brain) is located at the back of the head. Its function is to coordinate voluntary muscle movements and to maintain posture, balance, and equilibrium.

More specifically, other parts of the brain include the following:

Anatomy of the brain, child
Click Image to Enlarge

  • Pons. A deep part of the brain, located in the brainstem, the pons contains many of the control areas for eye and face movements.

  • Medulla. The lowest part of the brainstem, the medulla is the most vital part of the entire brain and contains important control centers for the heart and lungs.

  • Spinal cord. A large bundle of nerve fibers located in the back that extends from the base of the brain to the lower back, the spinal cord carries messages to and from the brain and the rest of the body.

  • Frontal lobe. The largest section of the brain located in the front of the head, the frontal lobe is involved in judgment, decision-making, some language functions, personality characteristics, and movement.

  • Parietal lobe. The middle part of the brain, the parietal lobe helps a person to identify objects and understand spatial relationships (where one's body is compared to objects around the person). The parietal lobe is also involved in interpreting pain and touch in the body.

  • Occipital lobe. The occipital lobe is the back part of the brain that is involved with vision.

  • Temporal lobe. The sides of the brain, these temporal lobes are involved in memory, speech, and sense of smell.

Reviewed Date: 06-04-2012

Anatomía del Encéfalo
Neurology
L. Matthew Frank, MD
Ingrid Loma-Miller, MD
Ralph Northam, MD
Svinder Toor, MD
Larry White, MD
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Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.