Visit Our Coronavirus (COVID-19)  Resource Section ⇒ X
Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Give Your Family the Gift of Regular Exercise

Give Your Family the Gift of Regular Exercise

FRIDAY, Dec. 18, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity could be the best gift to give your family this holiday season. And the American Heart Association (AHA) has some suggestions on how to do that.

Find open times for physical activity and make it a regular part of your family's schedule. Include it on a weekly calendar for the whole family.

Experts say children should be limited to one to two hours of TV/computer/video games a day. But the average 8-year-old spends eight hours a day using various types of media, and it's often more than 11 hours for teenagers.

The coronavirus pandemic has upended organized sports for many kids, with many becoming even more sedentary.

Provide youngsters with age-appropriate physically active alternatives to TV or video games after school, the AHA advises.

Here are some other suggestions:

  • Limit children's TV, computer, smartphone and video game time. Don't make the TV the main focus of a room.

  • Don't let kids have televisions or video game devices in their bedrooms, and don't use TV time as a reward or punishment.

  • Plan TV watching in advance. Select the shows you want to watch, and turn the TV on for only those shows and turn it off when they're over. Don't just watch whatever comes on next.

  • Set a good example. Your children won't accept being restricted to two hours of gaming if you have unlimited screen time. Being a good role model is the best way to influence your children's behavior.

  • Be active with your kids. Develop a set of activities the family can do regardless of weather.

  • Start a family game night; get out to shoot hoops or kick a soccer ball, or walk the dog. You can also explore a nearby park, turn on some music and dance, or do chores that require some physical activity.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on getting kids to be more active.


SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, December 14, 2020

Reviewed Date: --

Find a pediatrician
Childrens Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Dr. James Bennett
Dr. J. Marc Cardelia
Dr. Bettina Gyr
Dr. Peter Moskal
Dr. Cara Novick
Dr. Stephanie Pearce
Dr. Carl St. Remy
Sports Medicine
Dr. Joel Brenner
Dr. Aisha Joyce
Dr. Micah Lamb
Dr. David Smith
Health Tips
Abuse of Prescription ADHD Medicines Rising on College Campuses
Guidelines for Raising Smoke-Free Kids
Helping Kids Get Over their Fears
It’s Snow Fun: Skiing and Snowboarding
Making Family Fitness Fun
Parenting Déjà vu: Raising Your Grandchildren
Parents-to-Be Must Communicate
Reading to Kids Helps Their Development
Strength Training at Home
Talking About Sex with Your Teen
Talking With Your Kids About Drugs, Alcohol, and Tobacco
When Can a Child Wear Contact Lenses
Quizzes
Snow Sports Safety Quiz
Swimming Quiz
Teen Health Quiz
NewsLetters
3 Retro Fitness Trends Worth Trying
Find (and Keep) Your Exercise Motivation
Get Moving While Dinner’s Cooking
How Housework Can Help You Meet Your Exercise Goals
Pressed for Time? HIIT It
Running Free: The Key Is Injury Prevention
The Great Pumpkin Workout
Diseases & Conditions
Adolescent (13 to 18 Years)
Amenorrhea in Teens
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma in Children Index
Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) in Children
Bone Marrow Transplant for Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Breast Conditions in Young Women
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Discipline
Ewing Sarcoma in Children
Exercise and Children
Exercise and Teenagers
Female Growth and Development
Firearms
Gynecological and Menstrual Conditions
Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) in Children
High Blood Pressure in Children and Teens
Home Page - Adolescent Medicine
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Major Depression in Teens
Meningitis in Children
Menstrual Cramps (Dysmenorrhea) in Teens
Menstrual Disorders
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Myasthenia Gravis (MG) in Children
Oral Health
Osteosarcoma (Osteogenic Sarcoma) in Children
Overview of Adolescent Health Problems
Pap Test for Adolescents
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Children
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Schizophrenia in Children
School-Aged Child Nutrition
Sports Safety for Children
Superficial Injuries of the Face and Head- Overview
Teens and Diabetes Mellitus
Television and Children
Thalassemia
The Growing Child- Teenager (13 to 18 Years)
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Heart
The Kidneys
Your Child's Asthma
Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.