Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Add Asthma to List of Possible Causes of Childhood Obesity

Add Asthma to List of Possible Causes of Childhood Obesity

FRIDAY, Oct. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Children with asthma are at increased risk for childhood obesity, a new study suggests.

Obesity is widely regarded as a risk factor for asthma, but these new findings suggest the reverse is true, too, according to the researchers.

The study authors analyzed data from more than 21,000 children in nine European countries who were diagnosed with asthma at ages 3 to 4 years old and followed up to age 8.

Compared to toddlers without asthma, those with asthma were 66 percent more likely to become obese, and the risk was 50 percent higher among those with persistent wheezing.

Children with active asthma were nearly twice as likely to become obese than those without asthma and wheezing, according to the study.

"Asthma may contribute to the obesity epidemic. We urgently need to know if prevention and adequate treatment of asthma can reduce the trajectory toward obesity," study co-author Frank Gilliland, professor of preventive medicine at the University of Southern California, said in a university news release.

One way that asthma may contribute to obesity is by limiting children's physical activity, the researchers said.

It's also been suggested that higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids used to treat asthma may increase the risk of obesity. In this study, children with asthma who used medication had the greatest risk of becoming obese.

"We care about this issue because asthma affects approximately 6.5 million children -- about 1 in 10 -- in the United States," said study senior author Lida Chatzi, also a professor of preventive medicine at USC.

"It's a chronic childhood disorder and if it increases the risk of obesity, we can advise parents and physicians on how to treat it and intervene to help young children grow up to enjoy healthy, adult lives," Chatzi said.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says about 40 percent of Americans -- or 93 million people -- are obese. Obesity is linked to diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure and stroke.

Meanwhile, the number of Americans with asthma in the United States is growing every year. About 1 in 12 people now has the illness, the study authors said.

The study was published recently in the European Respiratory Journal.

More information

The American Lung Association has more on childhood asthma.

SOURCE: University of Southern California, news release, Oct. 9, 2018

Reviewed Date: --

Find a pediatrician
Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Dr. Angela Duff Hogan
Dr. Cynthia Kelly
Dr. Kelly Maples
Dr. Lindsey Moore
Dr. Maripaz Morales
Dr. Lauren Smith
Pulmonology
Dr. Frank Chocano
Dr. Cynthia Epstein
Dr. Lori Vanscoy
Health Tips
A Chubby Baby Is Not a Sign of Future Obesity
Abuse of Prescription ADHD Medicines Rising on College Campuses
Guidelines for Raising Smoke-Free Kids
Helping Kids Get Over their Fears
How Old Is "Old Enough" for Contacts?
Is It Time for Toilet Training?
Parenting Déjà vu: Raising Your Grandchildren
Parents-to-Be Must Communicate
Reading to Kids Helps Their Development
Sports and Music: Both Good for Kids
Talk With Your Kids About These Issues
Talking About Sex with Your Teen
Weight Room No Longer Off-Limits to Kids
Quizzes
Asthma Awareness Quiz
Asthma in Children Quiz
Asthma Knowledge Quiz
Asthma Quick-Relief Medicine Quiz
Asthma Triggers Quiz
Child Development Quiz
Childhood Asthma Quiz
Prevention
Prevention Guidelines for Men 18 to 39
Prevention Guidelines for Women 18 to 39
Prevention Guidelines for Women 40-49
Prevention Guidelines for Women 50-64
Prevention Guidelines for Women 65+
Prevention Guidelines, Ages 2 to 18
NewsLetters
5 Tips for Surviving Baby’s First Year
Add Some Play to Your Child’s Day
Colorectal Cancer Before Age 50: A Weighty Reason Rates Are Rising
Cultivating Curiosity in Kids Is Key for Academic Success
Early Obesity Can Change Heart Structure
Good Night, Sleep Tight—And Symptom-Free
Love, Marriage, and Diabetes Risk
Diseases & Conditions
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma in Children
Asthma in Children Index
Asthma Triggers
Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) in Children
Bone Marrow Transplant for Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Chronic Respiratory Disorders
Discipline
Ewing Sarcoma in Children
Firearms
Hepatitis B (HBV) in Children
Home Page - Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Meningitis in Children
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Myasthenia Gravis (MG) in Children
Obesity in Teens
Osteosarcoma (Osteogenic Sarcoma) in Children
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Children
Pregnancy and Medical Conditions
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Schizophrenia in Children
School-Aged Child Nutrition
Sports Safety for Children
Superficial Injuries of the Face and Head- Overview
Television and Children
Thalassemia
The Growing Child: 1 to 3 Months
The Growing Child: 10 to 12 Months
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Growing Child: 4 to 6 Months
The Growing Child: 7 to 9 Months
The Growing Child: Newborn
The Growing Child: Preschool (4 to 5 Years)
The Growing Child: School-Age (6 to 12 Years)
The Heart
The Kidneys
Topic Index - Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology
Your Child's Asthma
Your Child's Asthma: Avoiding Triggers
Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups
Your Child's Asthma: How Severe Is It?
Your Child's Asthma: Nebulizer Treatments
Your Child's Asthma: Peak Flow Meters, Oximeters, and Spirometers

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.