Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Secondhand Pot Smoke Found in Kids' Lungs

Secondhand Pot Smoke Found in Kids' Lungs

MONDAY, Nov. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you're a pot-smoking parent and you think your kids aren't affected, think again.

New research found evidence of secondhand marijuana smoke exposure in nearly half of children whose parents smoke the drug.

"While the effects of tobacco smoke have been studied extensively, we are still learning about marijuana exposure," said researcher Dr. Karen Wilson, from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

"What we found in this study is that secondhand marijuana smoke does get into the lungs and little bodies of young children," Wilson said in a school news release.

The study included parents in Colorado who used marijuana and was conducted after recreational use of the drug became legal in that state. Currently, 10 states permit recreational marijuana use and 33 allow medical use of the drug.

Among the parents in the study, smoking was the most common form of marijuana use (30 percent), followed by edibles (14.5 percent) and vaporizers (9.6 percent), the investigators found.

Urine samples were collected from the parents' children. Those samples revealed that 46 percent of the youngsters had detectable levels of the marijuana metabolite tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (COOH-THC), and 11 percent had detectable levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana.

THC is an indicator of both recent and active exposure to marijuana, and a higher level of exposure overall.

"These are worrisome results, suggesting nearly half of the children of parents who smoke marijuana are getting exposed, and 11 percent are exposed to a much greater degree," Wilson said.

Most parents (84 percent) said no one ever smoked marijuana inside their homes, while 7.4 percent said marijuana was smoked in their home daily, the researchers said.

When asked what happened if someone wanted to smoke marijuana in the home while the children were present, 52 percent of parents said there was no smoking when children were home, 22 percent stepped outside, and nearly one in 10 smoked in another room or another floor.

One-third of children whose parents stepped outside to smoke tested positive for COOH-THC, according to the report published online Nov. 19 in Pediatrics.

"Stepping outside might sound like a good idea, but the evidence we collected suggests that kids are still getting exposed through secondhand or possibly thirdhand smoke exposure," Wilson said.

"We know that thirdhand smoke -- smoke that lingers in our hair, our clothes, even our skin -- results in biological exposure that we can detect. What remains unclear is the extent and consequence of this mechanism of exposure," Wilson explained.

"Our findings suggest that smoking in the home, even in a different room, results in exposure to children. The more we understand secondhand and thirdhand smoke exposure, the better we can protect children in the home in states where marijuana is legal," she added.

Tobacco and marijuana smoke contain similar harmful chemicals, the researchers noted.

The study authors pointed out that most states that permit marijuana use don't allow it in public indoor and outdoor spaces, but do not have restrictions on smoking marijuana in the presence of children.

More information

The American Nonsmokers' Rights Foundation has more on secondhand marijuana smoke.

SOURCE: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, news release, Nov. 19, 2018

Reviewed Date: --

Find a pediatrician
Health Tips
Abuse of Prescription ADHD Medicines Rising on College Campuses
Guidelines for Raising Smoke-Free Kids
Helping Kids Get Over their Fears
How Old Is "Old Enough" for Contacts?
Parenting Déjà vu: Raising Your Grandchildren
Parents-to-Be Must Communicate
Reading to Kids Helps Their Development
Talk With Your Kids About These Issues
Talking About Sex with Your Teen
The Facts About Recreational Marijuana
NewsLetters
5 Tips for Surviving Baby’s First Year
Cultivating Curiosity in Kids Is Key for Academic Success
Homework Help: For Parents
Diseases & Conditions
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma in Children Index
Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) in Children
Bone Marrow Transplant for Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Discipline
Ewing Sarcoma in Children
Firearms
Hepatitis B (HBV) in Children
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Meningitis in Children
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Myasthenia Gravis (MG) in Children
Osteosarcoma (Osteogenic Sarcoma) in Children
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Children
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Schizophrenia in Children
School-Aged Child Nutrition
Sports Safety for Children
Superficial Injuries of the Face and Head- Overview
Television and Children
Thalassemia
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Heart
The Kidneys
Your Child's Asthma
Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.