Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Why Do Some Kids With Eczema Develop Food Allergies?

Why Do Some Kids With Eczema Develop Food Allergies?

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have added to a growing body of evidence that skin plays a major role in food allergies.

Their study of 62 children with eczema found that those with food allergies had skin irregularities not present on others.

Those irregularities included a lack of structural proteins needed to retain moisture and produce an effective skin barrier; increases in certain keratin proteins indicative of an immature skin barrier; and increased activation of type 2 immune genes, which are associated with allergic diseases.

The findings suggest that individualized treatment might help protect some patients with eczema (atopic dermatitis) from food allergies, according to the study authors.

"The skin of atopic dermatitis patients with food allergies show clear markers of a predisposition to allergic diseases and a faulty skin barrier," said lead author Dr. Donald Leung. "They suggest that personalized treatment of these children may reduce the risk of developing both atopic dermatitis and food allergies."

Leung is head of pediatric allergy and immunology at National Jewish Health in Denver.

Eczema affects up to 20 percent of children, causing dry, itchy and cracked skin. About 30 percent of kids with eczema develop food allergies.

"The skin of atopic dermatitis patients loses water and dries out," Leung said in a news release. "It can crack like potato chips. Increasing evidence indicates that when food particles enter those cracks, they can promote the development of food allergies."

The findings suggest eczema patients who develop food allergies are a "distinct subset," Leung said.

"The first weeks after birth, when an infant goes from the watery environment of the womb to the dry air of the outside world, is particularly traumatic for an infant's skin. We believe early treatment to maintain moist skin and a healthy skin barrier is especially important for these patients," he said.

The skin-testing technique used in this study may help identify infants who are at risk for food allergies and allow for preventive steps, Leung said.

The study was recently published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on eczema.

SOURCE: National Jewish Health, news release, Feb. 20, 2019

Reviewed Date: --

Find a pediatrician
Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Dr. Angela Duff Hogan
Dr. Cynthia Kelly
Dr. Kelly Maples
Dr. Lindsey Moore
Dr. Maripaz Morales
Dr. Lauren Smith
Dermatology
Dr. Julia Burden
Dr. Judith Williams
Health Tips
Helping Kids Get Over their Fears
How Old Is "Old Enough" for Contacts?
Quizzes
Allergies Quiz
Food Allergy Quiz
NewsLetters
Could These Natural Allergy Remedies Be Right For You?
Diseases & Conditions
Allergies in Children
Allergy
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Animals
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma in Children Index
Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) in Children
Bone Marrow Transplant for Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Cold vs. Allergy in Children: How to Tell the Difference
Common Skin Disorders in Children
Describing a Child's Skin Condition
Diagnostic Tests for Allergy in Children
Egg Allergy Diet for Children
Ewing Sarcoma in Children
Firearms
Food Allergies in Children
Hepatitis B (HBV) in Children
Immune Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Insect Stings in Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Meningitis in Children
Milk Allergy Diet for Children
Mold
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Myasthenia Gravis (MG) in Children
Noninfectious Skin Conditions
Osteosarcoma (Osteogenic Sarcoma) in Children
Peanut Allergy Diet for Children
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Pollen and Children
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Children
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Schizophrenia in Children
School-Aged Child Nutrition
Shellfish Allergy Diet for Children
Soy Allergy Diet for Children
Sports Safety for Children
Superficial Injuries of the Face and Head- Overview
Symptomatic Conditions of Allergy in Children
Television and Children
Thalassemia
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Heart
The Kidneys
Treatment for a Child's Allergy
Tree Nut Allergy Diet for Children
Types of Allergens
Wheat Allergy Diet for Children
Your Child's Allergies: Dust Mites
Your Child's Asthma
Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.