Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Smoking Around Expectant Moms Can Harm Babies' Hearts

Smoking Around Expectant Moms Can Harm Babies' Hearts

SUNDAY, March 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Fathers-to-be who expose their pregnant partners to secondhand smoke put their babies at risk of heart defects, researchers warn.

For the new study, investigators in China reviewed 125 studies that included a total of nearly 9 million prospective parents and more than 137,000 babies with congenital heart defects.

All types of parental smoking were linked to an increased risk of these birth defects, the analysis found. Compared to no smoking exposure, the increased risk was 124 percent for women exposed to secondhand smoke while pregnant, 74 percent for men smoking, and 25 percent for women smoking.

"Fathers are a large source of secondhand smoke for pregnant women, which appears to be even more harmful to unborn children than women smoking themselves," said study author Jiabi Qin of Central South University in Changsha, China.

"Fathers-to-be should quit smoking," Qin said in a news release from the European Society of Cardiology.

The overall risk with all types of parental smoking was greater when the analysis was restricted to Asian groups, the study authors noted.

Women's exposure to secondhand smoke was dangerous throughout pregnancy -- and even before, according to the report. While those who smoked before getting pregnant had no added risk, those who smoked during pregnancy were more apt to give birth to a child with a heart defect.

Specifically, smoking while pregnant was associated with a 27 percent higher risk for the newborn to have a hole in the wall between the heart's upper chambers (atrial septal defect), and a 43 percent higher risk of an abnormality in which the smooth flow of blood through the heart is blocked (right ventricular outflow tract obstruction).

Congenital heart defects are the leading cause of stillbirth. These birth defects also affect eight in 1,000 babies born worldwide. Though treatments have improved, the effects last a lifetime.

Qin said women should stop smoking before trying to conceive and should avoid smokers, too. Employers can help by ensuring workplaces are smoke-free.

"Doctors and primary health care professionals need to do more to publicize and educate prospective parents about the potential hazards of smoking for their unborn child," Qin concluded.

The study was published March 24 in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

More information

The March of Dimes has more on smoking and pregnancy.

SOURCE: European Society of Cardiology, news release, March 24, 2019

Reviewed Date: --

This content was reviewed by Mid-Atlantic Womens Care, PLC. Please visit their site to find an Mid-Atlantic Womens Care obstetrician.

Find a pediatrician
Helpful Information
Mid-Atlantic Womens's Care
Pulmonology
Dr. Frank Chocano
Dr. Cynthia Epstein
Health Tips
Guidelines for Raising Smoke-Free Kids
Is It Time for Toilet Training?
Reading to Kids Helps Their Development
Sports and Music: Both Good for Kids
Talk With Your Kids About These Issues
Weight Room No Longer Off-Limits to Kids
Quizzes
Birth Defects Quiz
Child Development Quiz
Healthy Pregnancy Quiz
Nicotine Quiz
NewsLetters
Add Some Play to Your Child’s Day
Cultivating Curiosity in Kids Is Key for Academic Success
Homework Help: For Parents
Is It Safe to Vape During Pregnancy?
Lung Cancer May Be Greater Threat to Women than Breast Cancer
Should Pregnant Women Worry About X-Rays?
Diseases & Conditions
Anorectal Malformation in Children
Birth Defects in Children
Branchial Cleft Abnormalities in Children
Chickenpox (Varicella) and Pregnancy
Chromosomal Abnormalities
Clubfoot in Children
Congenital Heart Disease
Digestive and Liver Disorders Overview
Discipline
Graves Disease in Pregnancy
Identification, Treatment, and Prevention of Birth Defects
Lupus and Pregnancy
Maternal and Fetal Infections Overview
Maternal and Fetal Testing Overview
Medical Genetics: Teratogens
Migraine Headaches During Pregnancy
Neurological Conditions and Pregnancy
Physical Abnormalities
Preconception Care
Pregnancy and Medical Conditions
Risk Factors for Pregnancy
Sickle Cell Disease and Pregnancy
Smoking
Support Groups
The Growing Child: 1 to 3 Months
The Growing Child: 10 to 12 Months
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Growing Child: 4 to 6 Months
The Growing Child: 7 to 9 Months
The Growing Child: Newborn
The Growing Child: Preschool (4 to 5 Years)
The Growing Child: School-Age (6 to 12 Years)
Thyroid Conditions

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.