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Health Library A to Z

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  • Blepharitis in Children
  • Blepharitis is an inflammation in the oil glands of the eyelid. It causes swollen eyelids and crusting around the eyelashes. Even after it’s treated and goes away, it can often come back again and again for years. It can often lead to an infection of the eye and a loss of eyelashes.

  • Brain Abscess in Children
  • An abscess is a pocket of infection. In the brain, an abscess may be in one or more areas. This condition may cause problems with how the brain and spinal cord function. It is a serious and life-threatening condition that needs to be treated right away.

  • Congenital Muscular Torticollis
  • Congenital torticollis means that a baby is born with an odd position of the neck. The odd position is because of a tight, short neck muscle. It affects the right side more often than the left side. It may range from mild to severe. The condition is sometimes called wryneck.

  • Diarrhea in Children
  • Diarrhea is a common problem. It may last 1 or 2 days and go away on its own. If diarrhea lasts more than 2 days, your child may have a more serious problem. Read on to learn more.

  • Dislocations in Children
  • A dislocation is a joint injury. It occurs when the ends of 2 connected bones come apart. Dislocations happen more often among teens. 

  • Food Allergies in Children
  • A food allergy is when your child’s body has a bad immune reaction to a certain food. This is different than a food intolerance which does not affect the immune system. This is true even though some of the same signs may be present.

  • Home Wound Care
  • Your child may come home with unhealed areas that still require dressing changes. You will be instructed on how to change dressings before you leave the hospital.

  • Intensive Care
  • Intensive care is needed for children who have had certain types of major surgery: heart operations, organ transplants, or neurosurgery.

  • Lordosis in Children
  • Lordosis is a deformity of the backbone (spine). It's when the bones of the spine (vertebrae) in the lower back curve inward more than normal.

  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Children
  • MRI is a procedure that uses a large magnet, radio waves, and a computer to create detailed images of organs and tissues in the body. It’s used to diagnose problems in many areas of the body.

  • Myasthenia Gravis (MG) in Children
  • Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a disorder that causes weakness in muscles around the body. This happens because antibodies destroy some of the places where nerves and muscles meet. It mostly affects the eyes, mouth, throat, arms, and legs.

  • Newborn Warning Signs
  • Most newborns adjust well to the outside world. But it's helpful to know about these warning signs that could indicate a possible problem.

  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) in Children
  • Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is a type of behavior disorder. It is mostly diagnosed in childhood. Children with ODD are uncooperative, defiant, and hostile toward peers, parents, teachers, and other authority figures.

  • Physical Needs of the Dying Child
  • A terminally ill child has many of the same needs as any seriously ill child, including a routine for sleep and rest, and for pain management. Here's what you should know.

  • Scleroderma in Children
  • Scleroderma is an ongoing (chronic) disease that causes abnormal growth of connective tissue. It can affect the joints, skin, and internal organs. It is degenerative and gets worse over time.

  • Small for Gestational Age
  • Small for gestational age is a term used to describe babies that are smaller than normal for the number of weeks of pregnancy. These babies have birth weight below the 10th percentile. This means they are smaller than many other babies of the same gestational age.

  • Snakebites in Children
  • Both venomous and nonvenomous snakes can bite. It's important to treat all snakebites as if they are venomous. Here's what you need to know.

  • Understanding Eating Disorders
  • At least 8 million people in the U.S. are living with an eating disorder. Read on for a helpful overview of the 3 main types of eating disorders.

  • Warts in Children
  • Warts on the skin are harmless growths. They are caused by a virus. Warts can spread to other parts of the body and to other people.

  • Watch That Backpack Load
  • Most children rely on backpacks to carry books and supplies to and from school and activities. But a backpack that's too heavy or doesn't fit right can cause harm.

  • Water Safety and Teens
  • Teens are more likely to know how to swim. But they are still at risk for drowning. Read on for important tips to help protect your teen from drowning.

  • West Nile Fever in Children
  • West Nile fever is an illness caused by a virus. The virus is spread by mosquito bites. It often causes mild, flu-like symptoms.

  • What You Can Do to Prevent Child Abuse
  • Child abuse can happen in any family and in any neighborhood. Studies have shown that child abuse crosses all boundaries of income, race, ethnic heritage and religious faith. Read on for helpful tips for stopping child abuse.

  • What You Need to Know About Heroin
  • Until recently, heroin was not considered a problem among children of middle-class parents. But lately, it has been showing up in new places. Today the typical user could be a person from any race, part of the country, socio-economic level, or age.