Visit Our Coronavirus (COVID-19)  Resource Section ⇒ X
Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Pesticide Harmed Children's Brains: Lawsuits

Pesticide Harmed Children's Brains: Lawsuits

TUESDAY, July 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Lawsuits claiming that the widely used bug killer chlorpyrifos caused brain damage in children were filed Monday in California.

Past research has shown that the pesticide harms the brains of fetuses and children, the Associated Press reported.

Chlorpyrifos is approved for use on more than 80 crops, but was banned for household use in 2001. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is considering whether to ban the pesticide or declare it safe.

California banned the pesticide last year and the spraying of it this year. Some other states have moved to ban it, the AP reported.

California records show that from 1974 through 2017, 61 million pounds of the pesticide were applied in Fresno, Kings, Madera and Tulare counties, where the lawsuits were filed, according to Stuart Calwell, lead attorney in the lawsuits, the APreported.

The plaintiffs are parents suing on behalf of children with severe brain damage that the lawsuits claim was caused by exposure to chlorpyrifos while they were in the womb or very young.

At least 100,000 homes may need to dispose of most of their belongings because they are contaminated with the pesticide, lawyers said.

"We have found it in the houses, we have found it in carpet, in upholstered furniture, we found it in a teddy bear, and we found it on the walls and surfaces," Calwell told the AP. "Then a little child picks up a teddy bear and holds on to it."

All that needs to be cleaned up, because "it's not going away on its own," Calwell added.

Nearby spraying isn't the only source of contamination: Parents, relatives or others in frequent contact with children worked in the fields or packing plants and were exposed to the chemical that they passed on to children.

Calwell said he filed related lawsuits last fall on behalf of farmworkers who his firm said "spent years marinating in the pesticide."

The latest lawsuits seek potential class-action damages from Dow Chemical and its successor company Corteva Inc., which stopped making the pesticide last year. Neither company responded to requests for comment, the AP reported.

More information

Visit the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for more on chlorpyrifos.

SOURCE: Associated Press

Reviewed Date: --

Find a pediatrician
Neurology
Dr. Sarah Chagnon
Dr. Thomas Enlow
Dr. Ralph Northam
Dr. Crystal Proud
Dr. Svinder Toor
Dr. Ryan Williams
Health Tips
Helping Kids Get Over their Fears
Is It Time for Toilet Training?
Reading to Kids Helps Their Development
Sports and Music: Both Good for Kids
Weight Room No Longer Off-Limits to Kids
When Can a Child Wear Contact Lenses
Quizzes
Child Development Quiz
Diseases & Conditions
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma in Children Index
Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) in Children
Bone Marrow Transplant for Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Discipline
Ewing Sarcoma in Children
Firearms
Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) in Children
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Meningitis in Children
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Myasthenia Gravis (MG) in Children
Osteosarcoma (Osteogenic Sarcoma) in Children
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Children
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Schizophrenia in Children
School-Aged Child Nutrition
Sports Safety for Children
Superficial Injuries of the Face and Head- Overview
Television and Children
Thalassemia
The Growing Child: 1 to 3 Months
The Growing Child: 10 to 12 Months
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Growing Child: 4 to 6 Months
The Growing Child: 7 to 9 Months
The Growing Child: Newborn
The Growing Child: Preschool (4 to 5 Years)
The Growing Child: School-Age (6 to 12 Years)
The Heart
The Kidneys
Your Child's Asthma
Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.