Visit Our Coronavirus (COVID-19)  Resource Section ⇒ X
Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Nature Helped Many Kids Cope During Lockdown: Study

Nature Helped Many Kids Cope During Lockdown: Study

FRIDAY, Oct. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Children who spent more time in nature during pandemic lockdowns suffered fewer behavioral and emotional problems, British researchers say.

The investigators also found that children in wealthier families tended to increase their connection to nature during the pandemic more than those from poorer families.

The new study included 376 families in the United Kingdom who had children aged 3 to 7, and took part in an online survey between April and July 2020.

More than half of the families said their children's interaction with nature increased during the first lockdown, while the rest said their children's connection with nature stayed the same or decreased.

One-third of children whose links with nature declined had increases in acting out or in sadness and anxiety, according to the study published online Oct. 13 in the journal People and Nature.

"We know that access to and engagement with nature is associated with wide-ranging benefits in children and adults, including lowering levels of anxiety and depression, and reducing stress," said first author Samantha Friedman, a researcher with the Center for Family Research at the University of Cambridge.

"The COVID-19 lockdowns meant that children no longer had their normal school activities, routines and social interactions. The removal of these barriers gave us a novel context to look at how changes in connection with nature affected mental health," she explained in a university news release.

"Connecting with nature may have helped buffer some U.K. children against the effects of the lockdown, but we found that children from less affluent families were less likely to have increased their connection to nature during that time," Friedman added.

The findings show that nature can provide a low-cost method of mental health support for children that can be used at home and at school.

This could be done by reducing the number of structured extracurricular activities for children to enable them to spend more time outside; having gardening projects in schools; and providing funding to schools, particularly in disadvantaged areas, to implement nature-based learning programs, the researchers suggested.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more on getting children and teens outside.

SOURCE: University of Cambridge, news release, Oct. 14, 2021

Reviewed Date: --

Find a pediatrician
Neurology
Dr. Sarah Chagnon
Dr. Wendy Edlund
Dr. Thomas Enlow
Dr. Ralph Northam
Dr. Crystal Proud
Dr. Svinder Toor
Dr. Ryan Williams
Health Tips
Abuse of Prescription ADHD Medicines Rising on College Campuses
Guidelines for Raising Smoke-Free Kids
Helping Kids Get Over their Fears
It’s Snow Fun: Skiing and Snowboarding
Making Family Fitness Fun
Parenting Déjà vu: Raising Your Grandchildren
Parents-to-Be Must Communicate
Reading to Kids Helps Their Development
Strength Training at Home
Talking About Sex with Your Teen
Talking With Your Kids About Drugs, Alcohol, and Tobacco
When Can a Child Wear Contact Lenses
Quizzes
Swimming Quiz
NewsLetters
3 Retro Fitness Trends Worth Trying
Find (and Keep) Your Exercise Motivation
Get Moving While Dinner’s Cooking
How Housework Can Help You Meet Your Exercise Goals
Pressed for Time? HIIT It
Running Free: The Key Is Injury Prevention
The Great Pumpkin Workout
Diseases & Conditions
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma in Children Index
Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) in Children
Bone Marrow Transplant for Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Discipline
Ewing Sarcoma in Children
Exercise and Children
Exercise and Teenagers
Firearms
Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) in Children and Teens
Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) in Children
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Meningitis in Children
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Myasthenia Gravis (MG) in Children
Normal Newborn Behaviors and Activities
Osteosarcoma (Osteogenic Sarcoma) in Children
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Children
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Schizophrenia in Children
School-Aged Child Nutrition
Sports Safety for Children
Superficial Injuries of the Face and Head- Overview
Television and Children
Thalassemia
The Growing Child: 1-Year-Olds
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Heart
The Kidneys
Your Child's Asthma
Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.