Visit Our Coronavirus (COVID-19)  Resource Section ⇒ X
Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

Some Breast Surgery Won't Harm Ability to Breastfeed

Some Breast Surgery Won't Harm Ability to Breastfeed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Having surgery for benign breast conditions won't harm a woman's future ability to breastfeed, new research suggests.

The study included 85 women, aged 18 to 45. Fifteen had a prior history of benign breast conditions, including cysts, benign tumors and enlarged breasts. Sixteen had had breast surgery, including breast augmentation, reduction mammoplasty and biopsy.

Whether they'd had surgery or not, 80% were able to breastfeed or obtain breast milk for bottle-feeding, according to findings presented Saturday at a virtual meeting of the American College of Surgeons (ACS). Research presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Each year, nearly one million women in the United States are diagnosed with benign breast conditions. About half of women will have a benign breast lesion in their lifetime.

Many of these conditions are managed with surgery. Other common breast procedures include surgery to reduce enlarged breast tissue or augmentation for asymmetry or developmental breast conditions.

"Pediatricians and obstetrician-gynecologists who refer teenage patients for treatment of breast conditions, as well as parents, are concerned that surgery may impact breast development and eventual lactation," said study co-author Laura Nuzzi, clinical research manager at Boston Children's Hospital.

There is limited research on how surgery for benign breast conditions may affect later breastfeeding. The authors are continuing their research in this area, they noted in an ACS news release.

Study co-author Shannon Malloy is a clinical research associate in the hospital's Adolescent Breast Clinic.

Malloy said, "We hope to augment the conclusions from this study that suggest plastic reconstructive surgeons, primary care practitioners, and any provider who comes in contact with women who have a benign breast condition can reassure them that an operation for a benign breast condition is safe and should not preclude them from enjoying the benefits of surgery for fear of impairing future breastfeeding satisfaction and lactation."

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more on breastfeeding.

SOURCE: American College of Surgeons, news release, Oct. 3, 2020

Reviewed Date: --

This content was reviewed by Mid-Atlantic Womens Care, PLC. Please visit their site to find an Mid-Atlantic Womens Care obstetrician.

Find a pediatrician
Helpful Information
Mid-Atlantic Womens's Care
Children's Cardiac Surgery
Dr. Emily Downs
Dr. James Gangemi
Dr. Philip Smith
Childrens Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Dr. James Bennett
Dr. J. Marc Cardelia
Dr. Bettina Gyr
Dr. Peter Moskal
Dr. Cara Novick
Dr. Stephanie Pearce
Dr. Carl St. Remy
Neurosurgery
Dr. Adam Conley
Dr. Joseph Dilustro
Dr. Kimberly Mackey
Plastic and Oral Maxillofacial Surgery
Dr. Yifan Guo
Dr. George Hoerr
Dr. Jesus (Jegit) Inciong
Dr. Edward Santee
Pediatric Surgery
Dr. Duane Duke
Dr. Frazier Frantz
Dr. Michael Goretsky
Dr. Kendall Jones
Dr. Donald Kauder
Dr. Robert Kelly
Dr. M. Ann Kuhn
Dr. Margaret McGuire
Dr. Robert Obermeyer
Dr. Leonard Weireter
Children's Urology
Dr. Michael Carr
Dr. Charles Horton Jr.
Dr. Jyoti Upadhyay
Dr. Louis Wojcik
Quizzes
Breastfeeding Quiz
NewsLetters
Ch-Ch-Changes: Women’s Health Visits Through the Years
Healthy Eating While Pregnant or Breastfeeding
Diseases & Conditions
Adding to Mother's Milk
Breast Milk Collection and Storage
Breast Milk Expression
Breastfeeding and Delayed Milk Production
Breastfeeding and Returning To Work
Breastfeeding at Work
Breastfeeding Difficulties - Baby
Breastfeeding Difficulties - Mother
Breastfeeding the High-Risk Newborn
Breastfeeding When Returning to Work
Breastfeeding Your Baby
Breastfeeding Your High-Risk Baby
Breastfeeding Your Premature Baby
Breastfeeding: Getting Started
Breastfeeding: Returning to Work
Breastmilk: Pumping, Collecting, Storing
Difficulty with Latching On or Sucking
Effective Sucking
Expressing Milk for Your High-Risk Baby
Expressing Your Milk - Helpful Equipment
Flat or Inverted Nipples
How Breastmilk Is Made
Low Milk Production
Managing Poor Weight Gain in Your Breastfed Baby
Maternal Nutrition and Breastfeeding
Maternity Leave
Milk Production and Your High-Risk Baby
Newborn Multiples
Overactive Let-Down
Plugged Milk Ducts
Sore Nipples
Storing Your Breastmilk
Surgery and the Breastfeeding Infant
Taking Care of Your Breast Pump and Collection Kit
Thawing Breast Milk
The Benefits of Mother's Own Milk
Using a Breast Pump
Your Baby and Breastfeeding
Your High-Risk Baby and Expressing Milk

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.