Skip to navigation menu Skip to content
Jump to:  A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |   E   |   F   |   G   |   H   |   I   |   J   |   K   |   L   |   M   |   N   |   O   |   P   |   Q   |   R   |   S   |   T   |   U   |   V   |   W   |   X   |   Y

One Back-to-School Worry for Parents: Traffic Dangers

One Back-to-School Worry for Parents: Traffic Dangers

MONDAY, Aug. 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The dangers of school traffic is a major worry for many parents, a new poll finds.

In fact, a third of more than 900 parents surveyed last spring said speeding and distracted parent drivers are their main concern, and drivers who don't follow the rules should be banned from school parking areas.

According to the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health from University of Michigan Health, parents stress that school traffic can be hazardous to kids' safety. It's a scene with rushed drivers, cars in the wrong spot, and children trying to get through the mass of cars and buses.

"Many parents dread returning to the daily hassle of getting kids to school, and one of the top concerns involves children safely walking through car and bus traffic," Mott Poll co-director Sarah Clark said in a poll news release.

Nearly a third of parents fear for their child's safety going to and from school, with more than 25% thinking it likely that a child will get hurt near the drop-off area.

Along with speeding and distracted drivers, other safety concerns included parking in no-parking areas, dropping off kids in the wrong place, children not staying on sidewalks, and distracted bus drivers.

"Most schools have a plan to manage traffic and minimize the need for children to walk in front of or between cars," Clark said. "When parents don't follow these rules, it disrupts the traffic flow and may mean other parents have to drop off or pick up their child in the middle of the road. This situation may be even more dangerous if parents are distracted by phones or in a hurry."

School officials should take action when parents don't obey traffic rules, most parents say. About two-thirds of parents say the school should use cones, gates or other barriers to direct traffic. Also, most say police officers should give warnings or tickets to parents who violate traffic rules.

"Parents in our report overwhelmingly want school officials to be more proactive in addressing school traffic problems," Clark said.

Elementary school kids are most vulnerable to traffic injuries because they are less likely to know when it's safe to cross the street.

"Parents should first ensure they are consistently following the traffic rules themselves. They can also take steps to prepare their child to travel safely to and from school by making sure they always look both ways for traffic," Clark said.

"School officials should also do their part to be aware of any safety concerns and strictly enforce rules," she said. "Ultimately, the responsibility for keeping kids safe lies with the adults in the school community, including parents, bus drivers, school officials and law enforcement."

More information

For more on school traffic safety, see the U.S. Department of Transportation.

SOURCE: C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health, news release, Aug. 10, 2022

Reviewed Date: --

Find a pediatrician
Health Tips
Abuse of Prescription ADHD Medicines Rising on College Campuses
Guidelines for Raising Smoke-Free Kids
Helping Kids Get Over their Fears
Keep Kids Safe During Yard Work
Parenting Déjà vu: Raising Your Grandchildren
Parents-to-Be Must Communicate
Reading to Kids Helps Their Development
Sports and Music: Both Good for Kids
Talking With Your Kids About Drugs, Alcohol, and Tobacco
Talking with Your Teen About Sex
When Can a Child Wear Contact Lenses
Diseases & Conditions
Anatomy of a Child's Brain
Anatomy of the Endocrine System in Children
Anxiety Disorders in Children
Asthma in Children Index
Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) in Children
Bone Marrow Transplant for Children
Brain Tumors in Children
Chemotherapy for Children: Side Effects
Cuts and Wounds of the External Ear
Cuts and Wounds of the Mouth and Lips
Discipline
Ewing Sarcoma in Children
Firearms
Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) in Children
Inflammatory and Infectious Musculoskeletal Disorders
Inflammatory and Infectious Neurological Disorders
Inguinal Hernia in Children
Insect Bites and Children
Kidney Transplantation in Children
Meningitis in Children
Minor Injuries Overview
Mood Disorders in Children and Adolescents
Muscle and Joint Injuries
Myasthenia Gravis (MG) in Children
Nutrition- School-Age
Osteosarcoma (Osteogenic Sarcoma) in Children
Pediatric Blood Disorders
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Children
Preparing the School-Aged Child for Surgery
Schizophrenia in Children
Skin Injury in Children
Sports Safety for Children
Superficial Injuries of the Face and Head- Overview
Television and Children
Thalassemia
The Growing Child: 2-Year-Olds
The Heart
The Kidneys
Your Child's Asthma
Your Child's Asthma: Flare-ups

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your child's physician. The content provided on this page is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your child's physician with any questions or concerns you may have regarding a medical condition.